Two thirds of 'rubbish' put out as waste could be recycled

Two thirds of 'rubbish' put out as waste could be recycled

Two thirds of 'rubbish' put out as waste could be recycled

First published in News

A REVIEW by Stratford-on-Avon District Council has revealed two thirds of the content put out as waste could be recycled or composted.

The assessment showed that rubbish could be reduced by 9,800 tonnes if everyone put all their waste that could be composted or recycled into their green bin or blue-lidded bin.

It also found some residents do not realise that food waste can be put into the green wheeled bin.

Councillor Mike Brain, whose portfolio covers technical services, said: “Our District residents understand recycling and are good at it, but just by changing our habits and diverting food waste to our green bin will substantially increase recycling figures but, more importantly, reduce landfill costs. These new vehicle signs provide an excellent message to remind us how this small change in habit can make a huge difference.”

For more information visit www.stratford-dc.gov.uk.

Comments (1)

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8:01pm Thu 24 Jul 14

EndGroceryWaste says...

The large amount of fresh food waste is a lose-lose situation for the environment, the struggling families in today’s tough economy and for the food retailers. There is no single cure, or silver bullet for food waste reduction therefore, we should address the food waste problem in every link in our food supply chain. For example, the excess inventory of fresh perishables close to their expiration on supermarket shelves, combined with the consumer “Last In First Out” shopping behavior, might be the weakest link of the fresh food supply chain.
The new open GS1 DataBar standard enables applications that encourage efficient consumer shopping by offering him automatic and dynamic purchasing incentives for fresh perishables approaching their expiration dates before they end up in a landfill.
The “End Grocery Waste” App, which is based on the open GS1 DataBar standard, encourages efficient consumer shopping behavior that maximizes grocery retailer revenue, makes fresh food affordable for all families and effectively reduces the global carbon footprint.

Rod Averbuch
Chicago, IL
The large amount of fresh food waste is a lose-lose situation for the environment, the struggling families in today’s tough economy and for the food retailers. There is no single cure, or silver bullet for food waste reduction therefore, we should address the food waste problem in every link in our food supply chain. For example, the excess inventory of fresh perishables close to their expiration on supermarket shelves, combined with the consumer “Last In First Out” shopping behavior, might be the weakest link of the fresh food supply chain. The new open GS1 DataBar standard enables applications that encourage efficient consumer shopping by offering him automatic and dynamic purchasing incentives for fresh perishables approaching their expiration dates before they end up in a landfill. The “End Grocery Waste” App, which is based on the open GS1 DataBar standard, encourages efficient consumer shopping behavior that maximizes grocery retailer revenue, makes fresh food affordable for all families and effectively reduces the global carbon footprint. Rod Averbuch Chicago, IL EndGroceryWaste
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