Strike a success, says fire brigade union

Redditch Advertiser: Worcester Green Watch outside the gates of Worcester Fire Station on strike. 1814588801. Worcester Green Watch outside the gates of Worcester Fire Station on strike. 1814588801.

THE latest strike by firefighters in Worcestershire has been a success, with plenty of public support, says a union spokesman.

Members of the fire brigade union went on strike yesterday (Friday) between noon and 5pm as part of the latest round of industrial action over pensions. They will strike again between 2pm today and 2am tomorrow, and again between 10am and 3pm tomorrow.

Steve Gould of the Fire Brigades Union said: "I've been on the picket line in front of the fire stations at Worcester, Evesham and Malvern, and the public are showing us plenty of support. Drivers have been beeping their horns and pedestrians saying they're behind us.

"They don't want firemen forced to work until they're 60 and have to deal with fires at that age."

A spokesman for Hereford and Worcester Fire and Rescue Service said there were no major incidents while the strike was on yesterday.

But the brigade is reminding resident to be vigilant during the weekend's industrial action.

Area commander Keith Chance said: “While the industrial action is on-going we will still be responding to 999 calls, but we will be asking members of the public to take extra steps to reduce the risk of a fire breaking out in their home.

“We would ask people to ensure they have working smoke alarms in their homes as this can provide them with an early warning if a fire should break out in their home. Above all else please remain vigilant.”

The union claimed yesterday that ministers have been "sitting" on proposals which could help resolve the row.

FBU general secretary Matt Wrack said: "We're astonished that the government would allow strikes to continue when for over a month they have been sitting on proposals that might point the way towards a solution. The ball is once again firmly in their court.

"Nevertheless firefighters simply want a workable pension scheme and an end to this dispute, and the existence of such proposals gives us hope that an end might be in sight.

"These strikes have only resumed because of a complete absence of proposals from government. Rather than speculate on the motivations for their behaviour, now that we know costed proposals exist, we call on the minister to send us proposals without any further delay."

Comments (10)

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10:57am Sat 3 May 14

bobbo1 says...

overpaid underworked,and a gold plated pension as well,give them the boot.
overpaid underworked,and a gold plated pension as well,give them the boot. bobbo1
  • Score: 1

11:31am Sat 3 May 14

Redhillman says...

bobbo1 wrote:
overpaid underworked,and a gold plated pension as well,give them the boot.
You're confusing firefighters with council workers.

Firefighters do have a good salary and pension, but the job they do, hours involved on some jobs, anti-social hours and the hazards are not worthy of peanuts. This is a skilled and dangerous job, but clearly you think otherwise and that they shouldn't be paid what they earn. Perhaps £10k is enough, or is that too much?
[quote][p][bold]bobbo1[/bold] wrote: overpaid underworked,and a gold plated pension as well,give them the boot.[/p][/quote]You're confusing firefighters with council workers. Firefighters do have a good salary and pension, but the job they do, hours involved on some jobs, anti-social hours and the hazards are not worthy of peanuts. This is a skilled and dangerous job, but clearly you think otherwise and that they shouldn't be paid what they earn. Perhaps £10k is enough, or is that too much? Redhillman
  • Score: -3

12:48pm Sat 3 May 14

Jabbadad says...

It's always difficult to value a Firefighter until you need one, but then there are many others in jobs just as important sometimes even more dangerous such as Lifeboat men many of which are voulnteers.
Since I understand that there have always been different grades of Fire fighters, doing different tasks, calling for different risks / skills, so I am sure that IF THAT IS SO then perhaps within the system there are less physically demanding positions and so having to work a little longer is reasonable.
I have nothing but admiration for our firemen, but not as much as I do for our troops who are seriously risking their lives because desk bound politicians have sent then into war zones with a lack of equipment and none worse than Northern Ireland when they were treated as target practise by the terrorists.
And our Troops are being made redundant again by desk bound politicians, and yet I understand that the troops don't get any where near the wages or pensions that are being claimed by others.
So yes there are huge ranges of vital services that we frequently take for granted BUT STRIKING is NOT the answer, and in my book those who won't negotiate (Both Sides) are as guilty.
It's always difficult to value a Firefighter until you need one, but then there are many others in jobs just as important sometimes even more dangerous such as Lifeboat men many of which are voulnteers. Since I understand that there have always been different grades of Fire fighters, doing different tasks, calling for different risks / skills, so I am sure that IF THAT IS SO then perhaps within the system there are less physically demanding positions and so having to work a little longer is reasonable. I have nothing but admiration for our firemen, but not as much as I do for our troops who are seriously risking their lives because desk bound politicians have sent then into war zones with a lack of equipment and none worse than Northern Ireland when they were treated as target practise by the terrorists. And our Troops are being made redundant again by desk bound politicians, and yet I understand that the troops don't get any where near the wages or pensions that are being claimed by others. So yes there are huge ranges of vital services that we frequently take for granted BUT STRIKING is NOT the answer, and in my book those who won't negotiate (Both Sides) are as guilty. Jabbadad
  • Score: 4

5:29pm Sat 3 May 14

bobbo1 says...

firemen are on a **** good wage,get real I add the union rates scale for your info,also NO ONE is forced to join the firebrigade yet there are hnreds for every vacancy,wonder why!!!!!!!!!!!!

http://www.prospects
.ac.uk/firefighter_s
alary.htm
firemen are on a **** good wage,get real I add the union rates scale for your info,also NO ONE is forced to join the firebrigade yet there are hnreds for every vacancy,wonder why!!!!!!!!!!!! http://www.prospects .ac.uk/firefighter_s alary.htm bobbo1
  • Score: 3

7:54pm Sat 3 May 14

THE FACTS says...

"there were no major incidents while the strike was on yesterday........."

So if they were not striking wot would the firemen be doing ? Playing cards, sleeping ?

There are very few fires....we have enough fire engines...
"there were no major incidents while the strike was on yesterday........." So if they were not striking wot would the firemen be doing ? Playing cards, sleeping ? There are very few fires....we have enough fire engines... THE FACTS
  • Score: 3

8:37pm Sat 3 May 14

Shropshirelad says...

Why should the Fire Service expect to be treated differently to any of the other types of employment in the public service. The Police have seen almost every facet of their pay, pensions and allowances adversely altered, as have the nurses (now, there is a job and a group of people who should go on strike because they are treated disgracefully) and almost every other public service job that one cares to mention. They have moaned and kicked up a stink but the Police cannot strike and none of the other groups have done so or even intend to strike. The one exception of course are the teachers who, it is arguable have the same mind-set as firefighters, a bolshy, left wing cabal who seem to think that they are in the only jobs that should be treated as a "special case". The continual strikes of both the fire service and the teachers have won them no friends and of all the public service employees, they are probably the very obvious ones for whom the public have nothing but contempt. Rather strange don't you think when, before the aspiring Scargill's in each of these professions took over some years ago, they were both held in very high regard. Get with it firefighters, you lost your halos when you joined the TUC and became just another group of workers with minimal qualifications but think that by threatening strikes at every turn, you will get what you want, you won't. They should take the right to strike away from the fire service, see how they like that.
Why should the Fire Service expect to be treated differently to any of the other types of employment in the public service. The Police have seen almost every facet of their pay, pensions and allowances adversely altered, as have the nurses (now, there is a job and a group of people who should go on strike because they are treated disgracefully) and almost every other public service job that one cares to mention. They have moaned and kicked up a stink but the Police cannot strike and none of the other groups have done so or even intend to strike. The one exception of course are the teachers who, it is arguable have the same mind-set as firefighters, a bolshy, left wing cabal who seem to think that they are in the only jobs that should be treated as a "special case". The continual strikes of both the fire service and the teachers have won them no friends and of all the public service employees, they are probably the very obvious ones for whom the public have nothing but contempt. Rather strange don't you think when, before the aspiring Scargill's in each of these professions took over some years ago, they were both held in very high regard. Get with it firefighters, you lost your halos when you joined the TUC and became just another group of workers with minimal qualifications but think that by threatening strikes at every turn, you will get what you want, you won't. They should take the right to strike away from the fire service, see how they like that. Shropshirelad
  • Score: 6

8:21am Sun 4 May 14

voledog says...

If the the government has capitulated and agreed to the union's demands then the strike can be deemed a success. I'm not at all sure that's the case so far.

Fireman are paid pretty well to provide an essential public service, and we should all be glad they are all so well trained and there on call when we need them, but they do not deserve the heroic and untouchable status they have somehow achieved over the last few decades. Their job is considerably less dangerous than those done by many who do not get anything like a fireman's pay, working conditions or pension provisions. We all need to eat (fisherman have the most dangerous job), we all need a roof over our heads (scaffolders and roofers are statistically at much higher risk than a fireman); even lorry driving is a much riskier profession.
I'm sure there are plenty of 60 year olds who are fit enough to provide many of the roles in the fire service, and they have many years of experience to draw from when necessary. There are certainly plenty of 60 year old fishermen, roofers amd lorry drivers out there! Firemen deserve support for what they do, but they are already on a much better deal than most people and 60 just isn't that old these days.
If the the government has capitulated and agreed to the union's demands then the strike can be deemed a success. I'm not at all sure that's the case so far. Fireman are paid pretty well to provide an essential public service, and we should all be glad they are all so well trained and there on call when we need them, but they do not deserve the heroic and untouchable status they have somehow achieved over the last few decades. Their job is considerably less dangerous than those done by many who do not get anything like a fireman's pay, working conditions or pension provisions. We all need to eat (fisherman have the most dangerous job), we all need a roof over our heads (scaffolders and roofers are statistically at much higher risk than a fireman); even lorry driving is a much riskier profession. I'm sure there are plenty of 60 year olds who are fit enough to provide many of the roles in the fire service, and they have many years of experience to draw from when necessary. There are certainly plenty of 60 year old fishermen, roofers amd lorry drivers out there! Firemen deserve support for what they do, but they are already on a much better deal than most people and 60 just isn't that old these days. voledog
  • Score: 5

2:19pm Wed 7 May 14

MJI says...

I would be happy to have 60 year old firemen drive the fire engines, they are not al going to be nearing 60 just a couple of them at a time.
.
Not all fire brigade employees are climbing ladders and pushing through buildings on fire.
.
I would be happy for older firemen to attend as they have something the younger one doesn't, experence.
I would be happy to have 60 year old firemen drive the fire engines, they are not al going to be nearing 60 just a couple of them at a time. . Not all fire brigade employees are climbing ladders and pushing through buildings on fire. . I would be happy for older firemen to attend as they have something the younger one doesn't, experence. MJI
  • Score: 1

4:20pm Wed 7 May 14

liketoknow says...

I think it's a sad indictment on modern society when a strike is regarded as a success
I think it's a sad indictment on modern society when a strike is regarded as a success liketoknow
  • Score: 1

8:23pm Fri 9 May 14

poontangy says...

I have a mate who is a fireman. He says he is now excellent at volleyball and cleaning cars because thats pretty much all they do most days
I have a mate who is a fireman. He says he is now excellent at volleyball and cleaning cars because thats pretty much all they do most days poontangy
  • Score: -1

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